Primrose & Thyme Cough Syrup

Primrose (Primula Vulgaris) is often overshadowed by her sister, evening primrose, but she has plenty of her own magick to share!


Feminine Primrose and Thyme are ruled by the planet Venus, Primrose being of the Earth element and Thyme of water. Primrose is often associated with Goddess Freya and is used to attract fairies.


Primrose* and Thyme together contain a soothing combination of chemicals which may help with upper respiratory tract dis-ease and coughing.


Primrose* contains saponine and is both exporant and secretolylic, whilst Thyme is naturally antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic. This makes them a powerhouse when combined by relieving bronchial irritation and inducing rest amongst other actions.


Whilst this syrup may not rid you of your cough (I'm not making any medical claims, here), it could shorten the length of dis-ease and alleviate the coughing - the syrup texture will help ease sore throats and the sugar content will bring some much needed energy.


Here is a tip for picking Primrose flowers, pinch the flowers and pull them out of their green sheath, as some are self pollinating plants and this means that the pollinating parts are left on the plant. Always gather plants legally and sparingly. I would recommend leaving the freshly picked flowers on some baking parchment for a few hours to allow the bugs to make their way off, or lightly run under a cold tap.


You Will Need:

-A Pan

-Jelly-bag/Tights (clean and unused)***

-Wooden Spoon

-Two Sterilised Jars

-Scales

Ingredients:

-100g Sugar (I used white granulated)

-200ml Water

-1 Cup Fresh Primrose Flowers

-A few sprigs of Thyme (I used 1 tbspn)


Creating Magnolia Syrup

1- Add the sugar and water to the pan and bring to a boil then remove from heat. Mix the sugar until it has dissolved.


2- In the meantime, add the Primrose flowers and the Thyme to one of the sterile jars.

3- Once the sugar water has reached a touch temperature** (not too hot, but still warm) pour it over the Primrose and Thyme and seal. Place in the fridge to steep for about 48 hours, shaking frequently.


4- Once the 48 hours is up, use the tights*** or jelly-bag to strain the liquid into the second sterile jar then seal.



A properly sealed bottle should live in a dark dry cupboard for a few weeks and once opened, it should live in the fridge for a week or so. Take one or two teaspoons a few times a day when cough symptoms arise.


You could also create a non medicinal syrup

by veto-ing the Thyme and adding the flowers to the pan whilst the sugar water is still hot - then heating gently for an hour or two before bottling. This can be used in cocktails, on pancakes, in cakes and more.



Primrose Tea:

Another primrose treat involves drying flowers on a baking sheet in a cool dark place, then popping them in a sterile jar and adding them to teas as and when.


*Due to the chemical composition of Primrose, this should be avoided by anyone who cannot tolerate aspirin. Regardless, always consult your GP or a certified herbalist. Not suitable for pregnancy or breastfeeding.


**keeping the temperature low ensures that the flowers and syrup don't burn and that the syrup retains as much of the beneficial nutrients and properties as possible.

***I don't own a jelly-bag, but I do own unworn and clean tights! I never use muslin cloths anymore as they absorb too much liquid, even after straining and wringing them out!



Lyra&Atlas and owner Hayleigh Walker hope you enjoy this recipe and any other featured on this blog, but we are not responsible for the outcome of any recipe you try from www.lyraandatlas.com. Always use your best judgement with ingredients & storage and be aware that results can and may vary. Be aware of all heated surfaces and any sharp or dangerous instruments used when crafting these recipes.

Any medicinal mention is from my own research, knowledge or personal use and should not be taken as fact. Always do your own research and contact a trained herbalist and/or GP.


References:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg12917543-200-science-self-pollinating-primrose-is-just-too-fertile/

https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/13901/i-Primula-vulgaris-i-(Pr-prim)/Details

https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/primula-vulgaris/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28214817

https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/herbal-summary/thyme-primula-root-summary-public_en.pdf

https://www.wildfooduk.com/edible-wild-plants/primrose/

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-823/thyme

Cunninghams Encyclopedia of Magickal Herbs, (2nd ed, 2018), Scott Cunningham, Llewellyn Publications.

A:   Witney, Oxfordshire

E:  lyraandatlas@gmail.com

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LYRA & ATLAS || KNOTS & ROCKS (2020) EST 2017

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